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  • On-line (Sign-up required): 53rd CiNet Monthly Seminar: Shosuke Suzuki “How does the brain decide to make an effort? Dissecting the role of the striatum in motivation and clinical implications”

On-line (Sign-up required): 53rd CiNet Monthly Seminar: Shosuke Suzuki “How does the brain decide to make an effort? Dissecting the role of the striatum in motivation and clinical implications”

 

CiNet Monthly Seminar
(On-line)

July 26, 2021
10:00-11:30
JST (GMT + 9:00)

Apply for participation from here.
Sing-up deadline: noon, July 21,  JST (GMT + 9:00)
When we cannot identify your affiliation etc., we may have to trun down your application.
You will be notified of participation details by e-mail on July 21.

“How does the brain decide to make an effort? Dissecting the role of the striatum in motivation and clinical implications”

Shosuke Suzuki
PhD student
Emory University

Host : Masahiko Haruno

Abstract:
Physical effort is a critical resource that organisms must invest wisely to ensure survival. In humans, maladaptive allocation of effort is commonly observed in psychological disorders, including Major Depressive Disorder. Understanding how the brain allocates effort in pursuit of various goals is therefore a fundamental question for both clinical and behavioral neuroscience. Thus far, decades of research in animals and humans have suggested a critical role for the ventral striatum in encoding cost/benefit value signals, yet this effect has strikingly been absent during neuroimaging paradigms that assess choices related to physical effort. Here, we review findings in the role of the striatum in motivation and its relationship with depression from recent work combining multimodal imaging, naturalistic paradigms, and computational modeling. Our work suggests critical spatial distinctions within corticostriatal circuits that include neighboring subregions of the striatum encoding different aspects of effort—invigoration, movement, and value. We further discuss the sensitivity of these striatal regions to depression and potential role of the striatum with respect to depressive symptoms.